Saturday, December 19, 2015

Scams are for Women: My experience with the NAPW (National Association of Professional Women) | NerdCabaret

Scams are for Women: My experience with the NAPW (National Association of Professional Women) | NerdCabaret: Here’s the best protip I’ve ever learnt, if they’re pressuring you to buy something�rightthissecond. They’re avoiding either you carefully considering options, or hoping you don’t have time to do any research.

Proman v. Google | Digital Media Law Project

Proman v. Google | Digital Media Law Project: According to the complaint, Google hosts four articles about the National Association of Professional Women, through its Blogger and Knol services, that contain allegedly defamatory statements about NAPW and Proman. As alleged in the Complaint, the posts at issue call NAPW a "scam," and label Proman a "scam artist." (Complaint   8).

The Complaint requested an injunction ordering Google to remove the allegedly defamatory posts, identification of the authors of the posts, and pecuniary and exemplary damages against the Doe defendants.

Women Work Smart: Watch out for Scams Attacking New Business Owners

Women Work Smart: Watch out for Scams Attacking New Business Owners: The National Association of Professional Women and the Cambridge Who’s Who seem to be in cahoots with one another. Coincidentally they are both owned by Scam Artist Matt Roman. There are also several other Who’s Who and other professional female organizations possibly owned by Roman that play the same game. Their play is to send you a direct mail postcard stating that you have been selected to receive a FREE one-year membership. After sending them your name and contact information to receive the complimentary membership someone calls and interviews you to see if you meet their high standards and criteria. It is some of the best scripted bait and switch scam sales crap I have ever heard. After you pass the interview they stroke your ego by congratulating you as if you’ve just won the Oscar™. Then the pitch comes on thick. They begin by trying to sell you two packages (neither of which is free, by the way).

Businesswomen Beware: How I Fell Prey To Unsavory Sales Techniques Targeting�Professional�Women.�MY�story. | Michelle Villalobos' Blog

Businesswomen Beware: How I Fell Prey To Unsavory Sales Techniques Targeting�Professional�Women.�MY�story. | Michelle Villalobos' Blog: “If you’re saying I need to pay $995 in order to receive the award, then I’m not interested and quite frankly, I’m not happy about being called and kept on the phone for this long for you to sell me an award.”

“Well, I can understand how you might get that impression, but that’s not it at all! In fact, here’s what I can do, I can make an exception for you and just this one time…”
Now I was getting angry. “You just spent 15 minutes on the phone with me, telling me about this award that I won, and telling me about all the things you were going to ‘give’ me, and now you’re telling me that it’s going to cost me $1000. This is the 2nd call I’ve received trying to ‘upsell’ me other things after having been ‘awarded’ a complimentary membership. Can you see how this might be construed?”

Anatomy Of A Scam: The National Association Of Professional Women - The Establishment

Anatomy Of A Scam: The National Association Of Professional Women - The Establishment: Not only are NAPW’s fees frequently hidden, they’re also ongoing. Once members sign in to the NAPW website, they lock themselves into an annual re-charge on their credit card. And the organization’s refund policy makes it very difficult to recoup the money lost.